Immigrants' rights activists in Boston rally for TPS Justice

Boston, Massachusetts - Immigrants' rights activists gathered in Boston on Monday to demand an extension of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Central American and Nepalese nationals.

Doris Reina-Landaverde of the National TPS Alliance speaks as protesters in Boston demand TPS extension for Central American countries.
Doris Reina-Landaverde of the National TPS Alliance speaks as protesters in Boston demand TPS extension for Central American countries.  © Screenshot/Twitter/TPS_Alliance

Religious leaders, labor organizers, community activists, and more joined members of the National TPS Alliance at the rally outside Boston's Government Center Train Station. There, they called on President Joe Biden to use his executive authority to extend TPS protections for El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, and Nepal and issue a first-time designation for Guatemala.

TPS is a temporary legal status conferred on nationals of designated countries who are already residing in the US.

When former president Donald Trump tried to put a stop to the program in 2017, TPS families responded by filing a lawsuit. Their protections remain active so long as the suit is in the courts. After that, the future remains unclear.

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Though the Biden administration has been willing to extend TPS for other groups, it has remained noticeably silent on the case of Central American countries.

This omission is particularly troubling, as advocates say the US government owes a "historical and moral debt" to Central Americans due to its long history of intervention in the region.

TPS holders and allies speak out during the rally

That's why TPS holder, activist, and labor leader Doris Reina-Landaverde urged Biden to "just take the pen and re-designate TPS" during the rally on Monday.

"We have just 68 days for the TPS extension ending on December 31. It's so hard to be in this stage every year, or every 15 months, or every nine months, to repeat and repeat the same story again," Reina-Landaverde said.

"I remember that President Biden promised us he will re-designate TPS in the first 100 days when he got the power. It's almost two years, and we still live in a nightmare to be separated from our kids," she continued. "Enough is enough. We need solutions. We need action."

If President Biden finally agrees to extend TPS protections for Central Americans, more than 400,000 individuals and their families will be impacted.

Cover photo: Screenshot/Twitter/TPS_Alliance

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