Senate Majority Leader Schumer joins in resignation calls as Cuomo rails against "cancel culture"

New York, New York - Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, the most powerful New Yorker in Congress, joined fellow Empire State Senator Kirsten Gillibrand on Friday in calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo to resign over allegations that he subjected several women to sexual harassment.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer added his powerful voice to calls for Cuomo to resign his governorship.
Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer added his powerful voice to calls for Cuomo to resign his governorship.  © IMAGO / Pacific Press Agency

In a joint statement, the Democratic senators lauded the "brave" women who have accused Cuomo of a range of sexual misconduct, with the most serious allegation being that he forcibly groped a staffer under her blouse at the Executive Mansion in Albany last year.

"Due to the multiple, credible sexual harassment and misconduct allegations, it is clear that Governor Cuomo has lost the confidence of his governing partners and the people of New York. Governor Cuomo should resign," Schumer and Gillibrand said in the statement.

The resignation demand from Schumer and Gillibrand came hours after 14 of New York's 19 House Democrats also called on Cuomo to step down.

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Representatives Hakeem Jeffries and Tom Suozzi, two of the five New York House Democrats who didn't call on Cuomo to immediately resign, still said the governor should consider stepping down.

"Under these extraordinary circumstances, the governor must seriously consider whether he can continue to effectively lead the state. No one is above the law," said Jeffries, the number five Democrat in the House.

Schumer’s pile-on is especially significant in that he is the second most powerful member of the entire Congress, second only to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

A spokesperson for Cuomo could not immediately be reached for comment after Schumer's statement.

Cuomo plays "cancel culture" card

City council candidate Marni Halasa holds a "Time's Up" sign in front of Governor Andrew Cuomo's Third Avenue office in New York City.
City council candidate Marni Halasa holds a "Time's Up" sign in front of Governor Andrew Cuomo's Third Avenue office in New York City.  © IMAGO / ZUMA Wire

Earlier Friday, Cuomo told reporters on a conference call that he has no intention to resign and blasted lawmakers as "reckless and dangerous" for calling on him to quit.

"There are often many motivations for making an allegation, and that is why you need to know the facts before you make a decision," Cuomo said. "Women have the right to come forward and be heard. But I also want to be clear there is still a question of the truth. I did not do what has been alleged."

He attacked the lawmakers who called for his resignation, which also include 50 Democratic state legislators. He also made the striking claim that he is a victim of "cancel culture," a charge typically levied by politicians on the right.

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"Politicians take positions for all sorts of reasons, including political expediency and bowing to pressure," Cuomo said. "But people know the difference between playing politics, bowing to cancel culture and the truth."

The Biden seems reluctant to support Cuomo. Press secretary Jen Psaki would not say at a briefing whether Biden thinks the governor should resign, insisting only that he supports the investigation into the allegations of sexual harassment.

Cover photo: IMAGO / Pacific Press Agency

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