NFL veteran Golden Tate begins his switch to pro baseball

Port Angeles, Washington - After 11 seasons in the NFL, veteran Golden Tate moved on from catching footballs to hitting home runs, announcing on Tuesday that he will play with the Port Angeles Lefties.

Former NFL receiver Golden Tate catches a pass in a game against the New England Patriots.
Former NFL receiver Golden Tate catches a pass in a game against the New England Patriots.  © Billie Weiss / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / Getty Images via AFP

After 11 years in the NFL, Super Bowl champion Golden Tate will hang up his cleats and return to his first love – baseball.

The former Pro Bowler, who hasn't played in the NFL since 2020, signed with the Washington-based Port Angeles Lefties of the West Coast League (WCL) on Tuesday.

The WCL announced the signing along with a statement from Tate about his decision to begin his professional journey in baseball.

Mickey Mantle baseball card sells for record $12.6 million
MLB Mickey Mantle baseball card sells for record $12.6 million

"I am extremely thankful to the West Coast League and the Port Angeles Lefties for allowing me to join their league," Tate said. "As some might know, I was drafted twice in baseball. As a child, my first love was baseball, so I’m excited about the opportunity to compete against some of the best young players in the league. I look forward to having a lot of fun and exploring baseball more."

The WCL is a developmental summer league for college players committed to "developing aspiring pros." They made an exception for 33-year-old Tate, who seems content as he captivates attention and shines on the league.

The athlete is no stranger to baseball elites. He was drafted not once, but twice coming out of high-school and college respectively.

Tate made his official debut as Port Angeles’s starting center fielder in Tuesday night's game against the visiting Bend Elks. He made a strong opening statement, battering his first RBI double in his first game.

Cover photo: Billie Weiss / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / Getty Images via AFP

More on the topic MLB: