Lana Del Rey returns to her roots with Blue Banisters

Los Angeles, California – Longtime Lana Del Rey fans have something to scream about: the artist's eighth studio album, Blue Banisters.

Lana Del Rey performed a live concert during the Danish Music Festival in Odense, Denmark.
Lana Del Rey performed a live concert during the Danish Music Festival in Odense, Denmark.  © IMAGO/Gonzales Photo

It seems as if Lana Del Rey used a lot of her time during the Covid-19 pandemic to write songs and make new music, and her fans aren't complaining.

Blue Banisters was released on Friday and is the indie rocker's second album to drop this year, following Chemtrails over the Country Club, which debuted in March.

But longtime fans of the New York native might feel more drawn to her latest release than others in recent years, and it's for good reason.

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For all intents and purposes, Blue Banisters feels like the Lana Del Rey people fell in love with at the beginning of her career.

With song structures that hardly follow the copy-and-paste norm often used by Top-40 artists, Blue Banisters is honest, raw, and real in every way it possibly can be.

The 36-year-old had no problems showing off her growth as a songwriter while managing to stay true to the roots that distinguish her from most other songwriters in the industry.

Lana Del Rey strips it down and keeps it real

Lana Del Rey attended the Breakthrough Prize Awards in Mountain View, California.
Lana Del Rey attended the Breakthrough Prize Awards in Mountain View, California.  © IMAGO/MediaPunch

The artist's eighth studio album has a stripped-down feel, something that's been lacking in her recent discography.

With mesmerizing piano solos on some tracks, and blaring horns on others, Blue Banisters leans on various musical instruments to carry listeners from start to finish.

From the second it starts, the track Beautiful gives off the same sonic vibe as her previous mega-hit, Young and Beautiful.

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In the 2013 single, Del Ray begged whether her love interested would "still love me when I'm no longer young and beautiful."

But the new song Beautiful takes on an entirely different point-of-view. Rather than asking if someone will love her, Lana Del Rey assumes a confident, learned-my-lesson position, singing, "So I'll be who I'll be. If you think that's cool, then I'll take you back."

The same self-assured energy bleeds into the track Violets For Roses. Rather than pining for someone's love or forgiveness, the songstress croons about finding her way back to her true self in the wake of love lost.

"Ever since I fell out of love with you, I fell back in love with the streets, and God, does it feel sweet," she sings.

Lyrically, the new album comes from that different perspective of a relationship – of someone who has loved and learned, and has come out triumphant.

It's no easy feat to release a 15-song album and have every track resonate with listeners, but it's something Lana Del Rey seems to have accomplished with Blue Banisters.

While no tour dates have yet been set for the album, they're surely imminent in the near future.

Cover photo: IMAGO/Gonzales Photo

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