Satanists strike back at DeSantis' latest attempt to push Christianity in schools

Tallahassee, Florida - The Satanic Temple in Florida is speaking out after the state's governor passed a law that seeks to push Christianity back into public schools.

Members of The Satanic Temple are planning to protest a recent bill passed in Florida that seeks to bring faith leaders on public school campuses.
Members of The Satanic Temple are planning to protest a recent bill passed in Florida that seeks to bring faith leaders on public school campuses.  © Collage: Joseph Prezioso / AFP & Anna Moneymaker / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / Getty Images via AFP

According to The Guardian, members of the Temple say they will be signing up to participate following the recent passage of HB 931 – a bill that allows schools to implement a chaplain program, where volunteers would provide "additional counseling and support to students."

Governor Ron DeSantis has made it clear that he believes the bill, which went into effect on July 1, will help bring "faith leaders and patriotic organizations" into schools, once arguing that its absence tells students that "God has no place" on campuses.

The Temple, which has a long history of protesting overreaching politicians and laws that favor Christians at the expense of other groups, believes the bill violates the separation of church and state and has argued that if it stands, their members should be allowed to participate.

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When asked about the possibility of Satanists being chaplains during a press conference in April, DeSantis argued the group doesn't qualify, as he believes Satanism "is not a religion."

DeSantis goes to bat with Satanic Temple over Florida laws

"We're not playing those games in Florida," the governor stated.

In response, Lucian Graves, co-founder of the Temple, argued that DeSantis cannot just "declare something" and "expect it to be treated as law."

"If he doesn't understand that... he obviously has no place being a governor," he added.

Cover photo: Collage: Joseph Prezioso / AFP & Anna Moneymaker / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / Getty Images via AFP

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