Donald Trump: Could Georgia election probe be tainted by its head juror?

Atlanta, Georgia - The special grand jury that has been investigating efforts by Donald Trump and his allies to overturn Georgia's 2020 presidential election results are recommending indictments be issued for multiple people involved in the case – but its forewoman may be a little too loose lipped.

A special grand jury in Georgia investigating Donald Trump is recommending indictments, but a head juror may be sabotaging their efforts.
A special grand jury in Georgia investigating Donald Trump is recommending indictments, but a head juror may be sabotaging their efforts.  © Collage: IMAGO / Eibner Europa

Emily Kohrs (30), the forewoman for the jury, spilled plenty of tea during recent interviews with The New York Times and other new outlets, sharing that a list of recommendations will soon be revealed.

She notably avoided mentioning anyone by name, keeping her insight spoiler free, while teasing, "You're not going to be shocked. It's not rocket science."

"It is not going to be some giant plot twist," she told the Times.

President Biden suggests uncle was eaten by cannibals in bizarre anecdote
Joe Biden President Biden suggests uncle was eaten by cannibals in bizarre anecdote

"You probably have a fair idea of what may be in there. I'm trying very hard to say that delicately."

This is where things get murky: Kohrs perhaps isn't supposed to be discussing the case in the way she has been.

She has made her rounds on cable news networks and major media outlets, sharing details with the enthusiasm of a teen girl at a Taylor Swift concert.

In a clip from a recent interview with CNN, she gushed about subpoenaing the former president, stating, "I thought it would be really cool to get 60 seconds with President Trump."

CNN news anchor Anderson Cooper later questioned on his show if Kohrs' behavior as foreperson for the jury is "responsible." His guest Elie Honig pointed out that "she does not seem to be taking [this] seriously," and that Trump's legal team will likely dismiss any indictments "based on grand jury impropriety."

Did Emily Kohrs sabotage Fani Willis' case against Donald Trump?

Fulton County attorney general Fani Willis has led the investigation into Donald Trump's role in an attempt to overturn election results in Georgia.
Fulton County attorney general Fani Willis has led the investigation into Donald Trump's role in an attempt to overturn election results in Georgia.  © Collage: IMAGO / ZUMA Wire

Emily Kohrs' behavior is questionable considering this would be the first time a former president has been formerly indicted in the nation's history.

She seems to be enjoying her moment in the spotlight, giggling on camera as she is questioned by reporters and appearing to enjoy the act of creating suspense around the trial.

Kohrs also appears enamored by the former president, as she is seen grinning from ear to ear whenever his name is brought up.

Trump cancels North Carolina rally at last minute: "I'm so sad"
Donald Trump Trump cancels North Carolina rally at last minute: "I'm so sad"

In November, Trump announced his run for the 2024 presidency, but he faces numerous legal troubles and open cases against him. The Georgia probe is seen by many as the biggest legal threat that could keep him from returning to the White House.

Fani Willis, the state's Fulton County district attorney who has led the case, and the special jury do not have the ability to issue indictments on their own. They will be bringing their recommendations to a regular grand jury that will ultimately decide what charges will be issued.

When Emily Kohrs was asked by CNN if she recommended charges against former president Donald Trump, she responded, "I really don't want to share something the judge made a conscious decision not to share."

The judge handling the case decided to keep some details secret when he released part of the recommendations report last week.

Cover photo: Collage: IMAGO / Eibner Europa

More on Donald Trump: