Robert F. Kennedy Jr. wins big as ballot access battle rages on

Pearl City, Hawaii - Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. scored a huge win this week in the uphill battle to get his name on ballots across the nation.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s presidential campaign recently gained ballot access in Hawaii as they struggle to get his name on ballots across the nation.
Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s presidential campaign recently gained ballot access in Hawaii as they struggle to get his name on ballots across the nation.  © IMAGO / USA TODAY Network

On Thursday, RFK's campaign announced that they successfully collected the 862 required signatures to establish their We The People party in Hawaii.

The party then went on to nominate Kennedy as their presidential candidate, making the state the third, alongside New Hampshire and Utah, to add him to its ballots.

"Mahalo to the people of Hawaii who made this great accomplishment possible," Kennedy said in a statement.

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"I'm inspired by how enthusiastic people are to collect signatures, create new political parties, and rally for real change.

"This kind of energy is what will get us onto the ballot in every state... as we head toward election day," he added.

Why did Robert F. Kennedy Jr. create his own party?

His campaign recently launched their effort to create their own party to help ensure that he is added to ballots in several US states, including Hawaii, California, and Texas, as his campaign has faced a number of roadblocks in their battle to gain ballot access.

Earlier this week, the campaign filed a lawsuit against Maine Secretary of State Shenna Bellows after she barred the team from collecting signatures at local polling stations during the state's upcoming primary contest.

Kennedy initially launched his campaign as a Democrat before declaring himself an independent candidate.

Cover photo: IMAGO / USA TODAY Network

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