Busloads of migrants land on Vice President Harris' door amid freezing temps

Washington DC - Busloads of Latin American migrants found themselves freezing on Vice President Kamala Harris’ doorstep on Christmas Eve.

Buses of migrants arrived at Vice President Kamala Harris' Washington DC home over the weekend.
Buses of migrants arrived at Vice President Kamala Harris' Washington DC home over the weekend.  © SAUL LOEB / AFP

Some migrants who were dropped off only had T-shirts protecting them against the 18-degree weather, as seen firsthand by CNN staffers. The administration said that two earlier buses had been taken to nearby shelters before others drove those to Harris’ home at the U.S. Naval Observatory. Passengers on the later buses were given blankets before they were taken to a church, according to the outlet.

"The D.C. community has been welcoming buses from Texas anytime they’ve come since April," SAMU First Response managing director Tatiana Laborde told CNN. "Christmas Eve and freezing cold weather is no different. We are always here welcoming folks with open arms."

It was unclear who was responsible for sending the buses to Harris’ home, but Texas Gov. Greg Abbott in September said the Lone Star State had sent buses to Harris’ home to protest President Joe Biden’s immigration policies.

Trump and Letitia James come to an agreement over changes to his $175 million fraud bond
Donald Trump Trump and Letitia James come to an agreement over changes to his $175 million fraud bond

A volunteer with the Migrant Solidarity Mutual Aid Network told CNN the buses were headed to New York City but rerouted to Washington because of the weather.

New York City sees surge of migrants

Though title 42's – a public health rule meant to slow the amount of migrants seeking asylum – Wednesday expiration was temporarily halted, New York City has already started to see a surge of migrants that could top more than 1,000 new migrants weekly.

"Our shelter system is full, and we are nearly out of money, staff and space," Mayor Adams said last week, noting the city could "be forced to cut or curtail programs New Yorkers rely on" as a result.

Adams spoke just before oversight hearings concerning the city’s response to the needs of asylum-seekers – over 31,000 of whom have come to New York alone.

"New Yorkers ... have been asked to shoulder this burden almost entirely alone, despite the fact that this challenge originated far beyond our city’s borders," Adams said, calling on DC to have other cities to help.

Cover photo: SAUL LOEB / AFP

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