Minneapolis' voters oppose Question 2 while other cities enact policing reforms

Minneapolis, Minnesota – Residents across the US headed to the polls on Tuesday to cast their votes on numerous policing reform bills, but not all passed.

A protester holds a sign in favor of police reform during a rally in Times Square following the announcement of Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict on April 20.
A protester holds a sign in favor of police reform during a rally in Times Square following the announcement of Derek Chauvin's guilty verdict on April 20.  © IMAGO/ZUMA Wire

One of the hottest ballot measures stemmed from Minneapolis, Minnesota in the form of Question 2. This amendment aimed to replace the city's police department with a Department of Public Safety that would utilize a "comprehensive public health approach."

The measure made its way to the ballot in the wake of George Floyd's death by way of Yes 4 Minneapolis, who garnered enough signatures to get Question 2 in front of voters on November 2.

Unfortunately for proponents of the measure, Question 2 failed to pass, with 57% of voters opting against the amendment, according to Fox News affiliate KMSP.

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Following the results, Yes 4 Minneapolis tweeted out a message of optimism in regard to the tough loss.

"We changed the conversation about what public safety should look like. We showed the country and the world the power of democracy and of the people. Now, we will work to hold the system accountable. We will work to heal our city and create safer streets for all our communities."

Policing reform results around the country

Protesters took the streets of downtown Cleveland, Ohio to demand police accountability.
Protesters took the streets of downtown Cleveland, Ohio to demand police accountability.  © IMAGO/Pacific Press Agency

In Austin, Texas, another so-called police reform bill called Proposition A failed to pass, with 68% of voters opting against the measure that would've increased the number of Austin Police Department officers on staff.

For Cleveland, Ohio, it was Issue 24 that was on the ballot, which would increase civilian oversight of the police force by creating a Community Police Commission. Voters seemed to agree with the formation of such a commission, as 59% of residents voted in favor of Issue 24.

In response to the news that Issue 24 passed, Citizens for a Safer Cleveland tweeted, "We are grateful for the generosity, courage, and leadership that the directly impacted families have shown in heralding this historic change for Cleveland."

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The same fate was in the cards for Proposal 7 in Albany, New York, which passed with 69% of residents voting in favor of the measure.

Proposal 7 will increase the authority of the existing Community Police Review Board in the city by allowing them to conduct investigations and have direct oversight regarding complaints over any policy.

The race regarding Initiative 2 in Bellingham, Washington, is still extremely close. At the moment, 51% of voters approve the initiative, with just over 11,000 ballots left to count.

Initiative 2 bans the use of facial recognition and predictive policing technology, and also prohibits the city from keeping or using unlawfully acquired data.

Numerous elections took place with ballot measures outside the realm of policing reform on Tuesday. New York City selected its new mayor in Eric Adams, and Virginians opted to replace their Democratic governor with a Republican in Glenn Youngkin.

This article was amended to reflect the as yet unconfirmed final tally of Bellingham's vote on Initiative 2, after a previous version said it had passed with 51% of votes in favor.

Cover photo: IMAGO/ZUMA Wire

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