Meghan Markle and Prince Harry dazzle in NYC amid raging court battle

London, UK - Meghan Markle and Prince Harry were the talk of the town as they shined on an NYC red carpet this week. Yet Meghan remains embroiled in a court battle waging on in the UK over her estranged father and the tabloid press.

Prince Harry (l) and Meghan Markle (r) also appeared at the Global Citizen Live event in New York's Central Park in September.
Prince Harry (l) and Meghan Markle (r) also appeared at the Global Citizen Live event in New York's Central Park in September.  © IMAGO/ZUMA Wire

The former royals have had a busy week.

On Wednesday, the pair attended the Salute to Freedom Gala at the Intrepid Museum in New York. Harry presented awards to former service members with Meghan on his arm, who stunned in a red Carolina Herrera gown that has the internet buzzing.

They followed up on Thursday by visiting a New Jersey military base in honor of Veterans Day. The two also made appearances in the New York area last month in visits to the UN, One World Trade, and Global Citizen Live.

Meghan Markle's cousin makes surprising admissions about their childhood
Meghan Markle Meghan Markle's cousin makes surprising admissions about their childhood

Yet, their public appearances this week come as the Duchess of Sussex remains embattled in a legal dispute with the publisher of the Mail on Sunday, a UK tabloid.

The publisher Associated Newspaper Limited (ANL) has appealed to overturn a February ruling that found the paper breached Meghan's privacy by publishing excerpts of a handwritten letter to her father Thomas Markle in 2018.

Her father leaked the "heartfelt plea" to the tabloid, according to Meghan's lawyers, in which she begged her father to stop talking to the media.

In its appeal, ANL said it has new evidence that Meghan believed the letter would be leaked to the press, and alluded to the fact that, perhaps, she even wanted it to be.

Meghan responded to the accusations in a statement read in court on Wednesday, while she wowed in NYC.

Evidence introduces new claims against Meghan

Duchess Meghan Markle (l) and Prince Harry (r) during their visit to One World Trade Center and the National September 11 Memorial in New York in September.
Duchess Meghan Markle (l) and Prince Harry (r) during their visit to One World Trade Center and the National September 11 Memorial in New York in September.  © imago/Future Image

Lawyers for the publisher called Jason Knauf, Meghan's former communications secretary, to the witness stand.

Knauf stated that Meghan had given him permission to provide information to authors of a book about her and Harry – Finding Freedom – which the duchess has denied contributing to in the past.

He also showed texts to the court which proved Meghan was nervous her letter to her father would be made public.

"I have been meticulous in my word choice," she texted, and that "in the unfortunate event it leaked it would pull at the heart strings."

The new bombshells have called Meghan's credibility into question.

Meghan apologized in her statement on Wednesday for possibly "misleading" the court. She claimed she did not remember she authorized Knauf to share information with the book's authors, and denied the letter to her father was intended to be shared.

Meghan has been at odds with her father since her wedding to Harry in May 2018. The letter, sent to her father a few months after, was intended to mend the relationship both with him and with her new in-laws, according to Meghan.

The 40-year-old said she wrote the letter to appease the royal family, who "expressed their concern over the public attacks" from her father.

"I had very recently married into the family and was eager to please them," she told the court. "At least my husband would be able to say to his family that I had done everything I could to stop it."

"To be clear, I did not want any of it to be published," she added in her statement.

The hearing ended on Thursday and a verdict is expected within the next two weeks.

If the court now rules in the paper's favor, the case will be sent back to the lower courts for a full trial, according to BuzzFeed News.

If it upholds its earlier ruling, the publisher must pay damages to Meghan's camp and print an apology on the front pages of its newspapers.

Or they can appeal once again, next time to the Supreme Court.

Cover photo: IMAGO/ZUMA Wire

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