Robert F. Kennedy Jr. requests Secret Service again after assassination threats

Washington DC - For the sixth time, presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and his campaign are requesting Secret Service protection, and this time, he's brought some receipts.

Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy requested Secret Service protection for the sixth time, citing a recent assassination threat.
Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy requested Secret Service protection for the sixth time, citing a recent assassination threat.  © IAN MAULE / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / GETTY IMAGES VIA AFP

According to Newsweek, Matthew Sanders, the chief operating officer for Kennedy's campaign, sent an eight-page letter to the Department of Homeland Security on May 1, arguing that their request is not unprecedented, as it has been made before by candidates such as Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama.

Sanders goes on to outline numerous instances throughout the request process where Kennedy's safety was in question, including a recent assassination threat.

"Secret Service became aware of Case #74495, who communicated about an upcoming assassination attempt on the Candidate," the letter reads, "and Case #74475, a man who described himself as 'a fearless military guy' and had to be removed from a Kennedy campaign event after threatening to 'cause a scene.'

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"And Case #74283, who stated, 'I am going to kill RFK Jr. on June 6.'"

RFK initially joined the race as a Democrat but later declared himself an Independent after struggling to connect with the party's base.

The letter lists other safety incidents, including one in October a man was arrested twice in one day for attempting to break into his home.

Back in February, DOH secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, who the House of Representatives voted to impeach that same month, rejected Kennedy's request, arguing protection is "not warranted at this time."

Cover photo: IAN MAULE / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / GETTY IMAGES VIA AFP

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