Prince Harry thoughts on the US Constitution didn't go over very well

Montecito, California - Prince Harry moved his family to America to escape being hounded by the media in the UK, but though things seem to be better for him, he shared that he still doesn't understand the way the First Amendment is applied.

Prince Harry loves living in America, but doesn't seem to appreciate the freedoms Americans love.
Prince Harry loves living in America, but doesn't seem to appreciate the freedoms Americans love.  © Imago/Starface

During his interview with Dax Shepard last week, Prince Harry was very open with how unrestrained media had caused harm to himself and his family.

As his mom, Princess Diana, was killed while trying to escape paparazzi in 1997, it makes sense that the royal would resent the media.

Harry was describing how his life had changed since stepping down from royal duties and relocating to California with his wife Meghan Markle. Though the paparazzi aren't hounding them as much as before, when they first arrived in California he said they had to hide out.

Feeling like he had not really escaped the media attention as he had hoped, the prince let it slip that he didn't feel freedom of speech, which includes freedom of the press, was being applied in .

"I’ve got so much I want to say about the First Amendment as I sort of understand it, but it is bonkers", said Harry.

It didn't take long for the throw-away comment to fuel a hate-storm on social media .

Prince Harry upset over press freedom as he feels under siege

In the interview Harry shared that he felt helpless not being able to protect his wife and child from the very media that chased his late mother.
In the interview Harry shared that he felt helpless not being able to protect his wife and child from the very media that chased his late mother.  © IMAGO / PA Images

For the most part, Harry and Meghan have been welcomed with open arms and support. After their shocking interview with Oprah Winfrey a few months ago, the world got some insight into just how destructive living inside the royal family can be. They received a flood of sympathy from Americans who were happy to welcome them to the States.

But his remarks on the First Amendment predictably sparked a backlash from mostly conservative personalities and politicians, who suggested – with varying degrees of subtlety – that it may be time for Harry to return home. Texas Representative Dan Creshaw boasted that he had just "doubled the size of his Independence Day party."

The prince acknowledged that he didn't understand everything about the US Constitution, but said he just felt a bit helpless having to deal with drones sent to take pictures of his two-year-old son Archie.

"You can capitalize or exploit what’s not said rather than uphold what is said. I believe we live in an age now where you've got certain elements of the media redefining to us what privacy means. There's a massive conflict of interest," he added.

Dax Shepard told Harry that he and wife Kristen Bell had worked hard to get the media for the most part to agree not to go after the children of celebrities, who don't get to choose a life of fame.

Harry expressed gratitude that after the frenzy surrounding their arrival had calmed, he can now at least take Archie out on the back of his bike without being chased by cameras.

Cover photo: collage: Imago/Starface & 123RF/ Serhii Kamshylin

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