George Santos investigation about to get huge update from House Ethics Committee

Washington DC - The House Ethics Committee, which has been investigating George Santos, will soon announce their plans for the embattled representative.

The House Ethics Committee announced on Tuesday that it will soon be giving an update on its investigation into Representative George Santos.
The House Ethics Committee announced on Tuesday that it will soon be giving an update on its investigation into Representative George Santos.  © IMAGO / UPI Photo

In a statement released on Tuesday, the committee, which formed an Investigative Subcommittee (ISC) in February to review allegations made against Santos, said they plan to "announce its next course of action in this matter on or before November 17, 2023."

The committee said it has "contacted approximately 40 witnesses, reviewed more than 170,000 pages of documents, and authorized 37 subpoenas" as part of their investigation into Santos' alleged misconduct.

Santos is currently facing 23 criminal charges for a range of offenses including wire fraud, identity theft, and money laundering.

Artist stages protest in German city that Trump's grandad emigrated from: "America, save yourself"
Donald Trump Artist stages protest in German city that Trump's grandad emigrated from: "America, save yourself"

He has also faced heavy criticism after it was revealed and he then admitted to telling countless lies while on the campaign trail and seemingly continues to do so, most recently telling a reporter that his five-year-old niece was kidnapped by "Chinese Communists" while at a park in Queens.

The New York Republican has been called on to resign by many of his constituents and colleagues, yet he has refused to do so. He claims his time in court will prove his innocence, and he plans to go on to seek re-election in 2024.

Will expelling George Santos set a bad precedent?

Congressman Robert Garcia of California (c.), joined by other House members, discussed a proposed resolution to expel George Santos from Congress during a news conference.
Congressman Robert Garcia of California (c.), joined by other House members, discussed a proposed resolution to expel George Santos from Congress during a news conference.  © IMAGO / ZUMA Wire

The committee's statement comes as a group of New York Republicans recently brought forth a resolution to expel Santos, which has been met with mixed reactions.

Santos has repeatedly argued that he should not be expelled before he is allowed to argue his case in court, which is also a concern for some House members – as doing so could set a precedent to become more common for politicians in the future.

The group that brought forth the resolution have argued there is plenty of evidence proving Santos' misconduct as an elected official.

Biden and Trump lay out rules of first debate to "ensure a civilized discussion"
Joe Biden Biden and Trump lay out rules of first debate to "ensure a civilized discussion"

They also point to the fact that Santos has openly admitted to lying. Plus, Nancy Marks, a former treasurer for Santos' campaign who recently pled guilty to conspiracy, testified in court that she and Santos acted together in a fraud scheme.

For the resolution to pass, it would need a two-thirds vote in the House, 75 of which will need to be from Republicans.

In a recent social media post, Santos vowed that he will "not beg for" his constitutional rights, and will allow his colleagues to "make their decision without my interference."

Cover photo: IMAGO / UPI Photo

More on George Santos: